What Is Uterine Fibroids? | HealthInfi - HealthInfi | We Secure Your Health

Sunday, 3 December 2017

What Is Uterine Fibroids? | HealthInfi

Overview

Fibroids are noncancerous masses of muscular tissue and collagen that can develop within the wall of the uterus. They are the most common benign tumor in premenopausal women. By the time women are 50 years old, 80 percent will have fibroids, but only 20 percent of women with fibroids will have any symptoms.
You may hear your health care professional call fibroids by other terms including uterine leiomyomas, fibromyomas, fibromas, myofibromas and myomas. They can be small or quite large. While fibroids can cause a variety of symptoms, they may not cause any symptoms at all—so you may not even know you have one. Heavy bleeding is the most common symptom associated with fibroids and the one that usually prompts a woman to make an appointment with her health care professional. You may learn you have one or more fibroids after having a pelvic exam.
Fibroids may cause a range of other symptoms, too, including pain, pressure in the pelvic region, abnormal bleeding, painful intercourse, frequent urination or infertility.
What actually causes fibroids to form isn’t clear, but genetics and hormones are thought to play a big role. Your body may be predisposed to developing fibroids. They seem to grow or shrink depending on estrogen levels in your body, but researchers don’t know why some women develop them while others don’t. Fibroids usually grow slowly during your reproductive years, but about 40 percent of fibroids increase in size with pregnancy.
At menopause, fibroids shrink because estrogen and progesterone levels decline. Using menopausal hormone therapy containing estrogen after menopause usually does not cause fibroids to grow. Growth of a fibroid after menopause is a reason to see your gynecologist to make sure nothing else is causing the growth.
Progesterone and growth hormone are other hormones that may stimulate a fibroid’s growth once it has already formed. A variety of treatments exist to remove fibroids and relieve symptoms. If you learn you have fibroids but aren’t experiencing symptoms, you usually won’t need treatment.
Fibroids are the most frequently seen tumors of the female reproductive system. Fibroids, also known as uterine myomas, leiomyomas, or fibromas, are firm, compact tumors that are made of smooth muscle cells and fibrous connective tissue that develop in the uterus. It is estimated that between 20 to 50 percent of women of reproductive age have fibroids, although not all are diagnosed. Some estimates state that up to 30 to 77 percent of women will develop fibroids sometime during their childbearing years, although only about one-third of these fibroids are large enough to be detected by a health care provider during a physical examination.
In more than 99 percent of fibroid cases, the tumors are benign (non-cancerous). These tumors are not associated with cancer and do not increase a woman’s risk for uterine cancer. They may range in size, from the size of a pea to the size of a softball or small grapefruit.

Who Is at Risk for Fibroids?

Your risk for developing fibroids increases with age. African-American women are more likely than Caucasian women to have them, and they are more likely to develop fibroids at a younger age. If women in your family have already been diagnosed with fibroids, you have an increased risk of developing them. You may also be at an increased risk if you are obese or have high blood pressure.

What causes fibroid tumors?

While it is not clearly known what causes fibroids, it is believed that each tumor develops from an aberrant muscle cell in the uterus, which multiplies rapidly because of the influence of estrogen.

Who is at risk for fibroid tumors?

Women who are approaching menopause are at the greatest risk for fibroids because of their long exposure to high levels of estrogen. Women who are obese and of African-American heritage also seem to be at an increased risk, although the reasons for this are not clearly understood.
Research has also shown that some factors may protect a woman from developing fibroids. Some studies, of small numbers of women, have indicated that women who have had two liveborn children have one-half the risk of developing uterine fibroids compared to women who have had no children. Scientists are not sure whether having children actually protected women from fibroids or whether fibroids were a factor in infertility in women who had no children. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development is conducting further research on this topic and other factors that may affect the diagnosis and treatment of fibroids.
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Types of Fibroids

Fibroids form in different parts of the uterus:
Intramural fibroids are confined within the muscle wall of the uterus and are the most common fibroid type. They expand, which makes the uterus feel larger than normal. Symptoms of intramural fibroids may include heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain, back pain, frequent urination and pressure in the pelvic region.
Submucosal fibroids grow from the uterine wall into the uterine cavity. They can cause heavy menstrual bleeding with associated bad menstrual cramps and infertility.
Subserosal fibroids grow from the uterine wall to the outside of the uterus.  They can push on the bladder or bowel causing bloating, abdominal pressure, cramping and pain.
Pedunculated fibroids grow on stalks out from the uterus or into the uterine cavity, like mushrooms. If these stalks twist, they can cause pain, nausea or fever, or extremely rarely can become infected.

Diagnosis

More than half of women who have fibroids never experience symptoms. When fibroids are symptom-free, they generally don’t require treatment. But even small fibroids can cause heavy or longer-than-normal menstrual bleeding and significant pain. Fibroids may also contribute to infertility.
The three most common symptoms caused by fibroids are:
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding. The most common bleeding abnormality is heavy menstrual bleeding—menstrual bleeding that is excessively heavy or long. Normal menstrual periods last four to seven days. If you have abnormal bleeding from fibroids, your periods are likely to last longer or may be heavier. Instead of changing a pad or tampon every four to six hours, you may have to change one every hour and find that your periods greatly interfere with your daily activities. You may also experience breakthrough bleeding, or bleeding that occurs between periods.
  • Pelvic pressure. You may experience pressure in the pelvic region. Many women with fibroids have an enlarged uterus. Pelvic pressure may be caused by either the increased size of your uterus or from the location of one fibroid in particular. Health care professionals usually describe the size of a uterus with fibroids in the same terms used for someone who is pregnant, such as a “12-week-size fibroid uterus.”You may also experience pressure on areas near your pelvis, including your bowel or bladder. Pressure against these structures can lead to difficulty or pain with bowel movements and constipation or increased urinary frequency and incontinence. Conversely, you may not be able to empty your bladder because the fibroid is in the way or you may get recurrent urinary tract infections.
  • Reproductive problems. Fibroids also are associated with reproductive problems, depending on the number of fibroids present in the uterus and on their size and specific location. While having fibroids can cause complications with pregnancy, most do not have any impact. Fibroids in a uterus do not create a high-risk pregnancy. The risks from fibroids may include a higher risk of miscarriage, infertility, premature labor and labor complications.
Symptoms caused by fibroids can be similar to a number of other symptoms caused by a variety of other conditions, including reproductive cancers, sexually transmitted infections and bowel and bladder disorders. So, if you are having any unusual symptoms, be sure to make an appointment to discuss them with your health care professional.Read More

1 comment:

  1. AM EVE, THANKS TO DR ONIHA WHO CURED ME OF FIBROID THAT ALMOST COST ME MY MARRIAGE,
    MY HUSBAND AND I DISCOVERED THAT I HAVE MULTIPLE FIBROID SEVEN WEEKS AFTER OUR WELDING,
    THE GYNA ADVICES ME TO GO FOR A FIBROID OPERATION, BUT A FRIEND OF MY INSIST THAT I SHOULDNT DO THAT, BECAUSE IS DANGERIOUS,
    SHE RECOMMENDED DR ONIHA HERBAL MEDICATION TO US, WHICH WE MAKE USE OF, WITHIN A MONTH AND THREE WEEKS, THE HERBAL MEDICATION SHRINK THE FIBROID, AND I WAS ABLE TO GRT PREGNANT.
    IN CASE YOU HAVE SIMILAR PROBLEM, YOU CAN ALSO REACH THE DOCTOR ON +2347089275769 OR EMAIL:DRONIHASPEL@YAHOO.COM

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